Forest Society Blog - News & Features

The Forest Society is part of the Northeast Forest Network (NFN), a coalition of organizations from across New England and New York who share a common mission of forest conservation, combating climate change, protecting clean air and water, and enhancing wildlife habitats.

The late September "autumnal equinox" brings days and nights into balance and equal length — but not for long. The beginning of autumn is a time when bird migrations peak as waves of warblers, then raptors — the hawks, falcons, eagles and ospreys — depart New England.

Throughout New Hampshire, fall hunting seasons are already underway. Sure, you could dust off your bow and try for a wild turkey hen, but there is another type of hen in our forests that is just as delicious and available for those who know how to hunt for it. 

Tanya Tellman was honored as the Conservationist of the Year for her 30 years of volunteering at The Rocks and Bretzfelder Memorial Park, and for a lifetime of exemplary stewardship alongside her late husband Dave.

Ellen Kenny was named the Trish Churchill Volunteer of the Year at the119th Annual Meeting of the Forest Society.

Have you ever seen a wild albino turkey? Dave Anderson shares the science behind the scene.

The Forest Society has received a generous grant from the VF Foundation to support our efforts to protect Clay Brook Forest in Hampton Falls. The grant will help us conserve this land as an undeveloped, natural space for generations to come.

Especially in New Hampshire, oak mast follows a boom or bust cycle, which means the amount of acorns varies from year to year. Over time, evolution has favored the oak trees that demonstrate this boom or bust cycle.

The Forest Society released its 119th Annual Report, in advance of its annual meeting on September 26.