Wildlife

The Forest Society's mission includes conserving land that supports New Hampshire's native animals and plants, so that wildlife remains a part of our everyday world. Visit this page to explore stories, projects and stewardship related to wildlife and habitat.

The Reservation Stewardship Department is responsible for the management of the Forest Society’s fee-owned lands (over 56,000 acres, the Forest Society’s largest asset).   These lands are managed with a vision that is focused on the future, ensuring the biological richness of the state while providing economic and social returns to the organization, its members, and the public.

There’s just something about the rural November landscape that whispers. It conveys a feeling of antiquity, a kind of sepia-toned memory as if the land itself remembers and projects a younger self-portrait; a time well before we called them “selfies.”

Enjoy photos from our 2019 Annual Meeting. Members and guest enjoyed summit views from Pine Mountain to a pontoon ride with the Forest Society's new President, Jack Savage.

Autumn in New Hampshire is a wonderful time to watch and observe some easily recognizable stages of natural cycles: hawks migrating, leaves changing color…bears fattening up as they get ready to hibernate.

Our fenced-in backyard orchard includes apples, peaches and pears. Outside the wire mesh fence corralling the semi-dwarf fruit trees are a few ancient, standard apple trees. Translation: much taller trees.

Thursday morning I met 21 residents of Havenwood Heritage Heights (HHH)at the Conservation Center floodplain for a naturalist tour of the trails. The weather was spectacular- not too hot and not too cold, with a blue sky and warm sun overhead.

A common theme on Something Wild is breeding. (Which is why we always sip our tea with our pinkies extended.) Seriously, though, we talk about the how, when and where because there are a lot of different reproductive strategies that have evolved in nature.

Most of the land that the Forest Society manages is forestland, but we also own over 450 acres of fields throughout the state. These areas provide valuable habitat and plant diversity on our landscape and are often havens for wildlife. We lease some of our fields to local farmers, who grow and cu

You may be familiar with hoarders (not the TV show, but same idea).  In nature, a hoarder will hide food in one place.  Everything it gathers will be stored in a single tree or den.  But for some animals one food cache isn't enough.  We call them scatter hoarders.