Wildlife

The Forest Society's mission includes conserving land that supports New Hampshire's native animals and plants, so that wildlife remains a part of our everyday world. Visit this page to explore stories, projects and stewardship related to wildlife and habitat.

The Reservation Stewardship Department is responsible for the management of the Forest Society’s fee-owned lands (over 56,000 acres, the Forest Society’s largest asset).   These lands are managed with a vision that is focused on the future, ensuring the biological richness of the state while providing economic and social returns to the organization, its members, and the public.

Our fenced-in backyard orchard includes apples, peaches and pears. Outside the wire mesh fence corralling the semi-dwarf fruit trees are a few ancient, standard apple trees. Translation: much taller trees.

Thursday morning I met 21 residents of Havenwood Heritage Heights (HHH)at the Conservation Center floodplain for a naturalist tour of the trails. The weather was spectacular- not too hot and not too cold, with a blue sky and warm sun overhead.

A common theme on Something Wild is breeding. (Which is why we always sip our tea with our pinkies extended.) Seriously, though, we talk about the how, when and where because there are a lot of different reproductive strategies that have evolved in nature.

Most of the land that the Forest Society manages is forestland, but we also own over 450 acres of fields throughout the state. These areas provide valuable habitat and plant diversity on our landscape and are often havens for wildlife. We lease some of our fields to local farmers, who grow and cu

You may be familiar with hoarders (not the TV show, but same idea).  In nature, a hoarder will hide food in one place.  Everything it gathers will be stored in a single tree or den.  But for some animals one food cache isn't enough.  We call them scatter hoarders.

Leaving the mid-summer forest to the hungry biting deerflies, I spend more time mowing fields or watering and weeding the vegetable garden. Like the forest, the garden provides a miniature ecosystem to study, tend and from which to learn…

There’s an odd pleasure that comes from climbing on a tractor and mowing a field. You can measure your accomplishment of the task in the neat parallel tracks that the tractor lays out behind the bushhog.

Sunday, September 8, 2019 - 1:00pm
DeeringHillsborough County, New Hampshire

The Forest Society and the Deering Conservation Commission are sponsoring this walk through the meadows of the Tom Rush Forest in Deering, NH.  This year there have been a large number of monarch butterflies in these meadows, and with the help of local naturalists, we hope to see several phases of this fascinating insect's life cycle in person!  You will learn about monarch biology and conservation, and about a local threat to NH's monarchs: invasive black swallow-wort vine.  Black swallow-wort has been identified on the Tom Rush Forest and you will get a chance to see this plant and learn