Wildlife

The Forest Society's mission includes conserving land that supports New Hampshire's native animals and plants, so that wildlife remains a part of our everyday world. Visit this page to explore stories, projects and stewardship related to wildlife and habitat.

This time of year, you're likely to see cars and pickup trucks heading home on the highways with fresh-cut Christmas trees tied to roofs or in the truck beds. Fraser firs, Korean firs, Balsam firs, and Spruce (ouch!)...

A "Hike-it-Yourself" Autumn Adventure: August 31- October 31, 2020

Thanks for being a part of our 5 Hikes Challenge for 2020! More than 700 people signed up for the DIY challenge and 300 hiked all five of their selected destinations! Registration fees support the continued stewardship of these beautiful spaces.

By the time the cold weather months hit us, three of New Hampshire’s eight species of bats have already migrated to warmer places in the South and Mid-Atlantic regions.

New Hampshire’s ever-changing weather and scenery drive the NH tourism economy and collective mood swings. Beyond the recent tumult of politics and pandemic, the forest offers an antidote: a sense of place, personality and yes, poetry.

Ellen Kenny shares her wildlife photos covering events both large and small occurring along Mill Brook in Concord on the Forest Society's Merrimack River Outdoor Education & Conservation Area.

Tanya Tellman was honored as the Conservationist of the Year for her 30 years of volunteering at The Rocks and Bretzfelder Memorial Park, and for a lifetime of exemplary stewardship alongside her late husband Dave.

The late September "autumnal equinox" brings days and nights into balance and equal length — but not for long. The beginning of autumn is a time when bird migrations peak as waves of warblers, then raptors — the hawks, falcons, eagles and ospreys — depart New England.

Throughout New Hampshire, fall hunting seasons are already underway. Sure, you could dust off your bow and try for a wild turkey hen, but there is another type of hen in our forests that is just as delicious and available for those who know how to hunt for it. 

Have you ever seen a wild albino turkey? Dave Anderson shares the science behind the scene.