Wildlife

The Forest Society's mission includes conserving land that supports New Hampshire's native animals and plants, so that wildlife remains a part of our everyday world. Visit this page to explore stories, projects and stewardship related to wildlife and habitat.

Tanya Tellman was honored as the Conservationist of the Year for her 30 years of volunteering at The Rocks and Bretzfelder Memorial Park, and for a lifetime of exemplary stewardship alongside her late husband Dave.

Throughout New Hampshire, fall hunting seasons are already underway. Sure, you could dust off your bow and try for a wild turkey hen, but there is another type of hen in our forests that is just as delicious and available for those who know how to hunt for it. 

Have you ever seen a wild albino turkey? Dave Anderson shares the science behind the scene.

Especially in New Hampshire, oak mast follows a boom or bust cycle, which means the amount of acorns varies from year to year. Over time, evolution has favored the oak trees that demonstrate this boom or bust cycle.

The Forest Society released its 119th Annual Report, in advance of its annual meeting on September 26.

It's been a HOT summer in New Hampshire. Statewde meteorologists track an average of 12 days of daytime high temperatures exceeding 90F degrees at the Concord, NH, weather reporting station.

The moths we have here in New Hampshire range in size from the 5-7” Cecropia Moth (Hyalophora cecropia), fully as large as an adult hand, to “micromoths” so tiny that you’ll need a hand lens just to see that they are actually moths.

Naturalist Dave Anderson cites many mid-summer milestones including reduced bird songs, common ditch-weed flowers, and shooting stars which reveal the summer season passing faster than expected.

Foresters, wildlife biologists and homeowners are watching a strong year for the development of the forest foods that will ripen into autumn apples, acorns and even a good pine seed crop in New Hampshire forests. Fruit trees and oak forests with acorns are THE supermarkets of the forest.