Forest Society Blog - News & Features

As we hunker down for the winter weather, we’re frequently too preoccupied with what is in our front yards that we tend not to notice what isn’t there. The snow and ice have muscled out the grass, and the chilly sounds of the north wind have blown away the dawn chorus that woke us this summer.

Concord - December 07, 2018 –According to local lore, the Stillhouse Forest in Canterbury was a hideout for an infamous gang after the 1950 Boston Brinks heist in which burglars got away with $2.7 million, including $1.2 million in cash.

This winter, backcountry skiers get to ride untouched powder on the late conservationist Dick Ware's land and adjacent areas in New Hampshire's White Mountains.

Andy Deegan was filling birdfeeders and letting the dog out in the early morning gloom when he encountered what he thought might be “the biggest squirrel I’ve ever heard” scrambling up a large white pine just outside his New London home.  It turned out to be a bear cub - an orphan.

The Heald Forest Reservation in Wilton will have a timber harvest operation in the winter of 2018-19 that includes prescriptions to remove overstory trees to regenerate understory shrubs - specifically mountain laurel - that can greatly enhance cover for wildlife.   The specific goal for improvin

This summer and fall, we partnered with WMUR to offer a series of guided hikes on our forest reservations with the goal of introducing hikers of all abilities to Forest Society properties with trail systems that possess excellent views or interesting destinations.

Winter is always the lean time of the year, but this winter especially, biologists are expecting scarcity for all sorts of forest dwellers: birds, rodents and larger mammals.

According to a new study released last week, our forests and other lands — not just here in New England but across the United States — could help mitigate nearly 25% of our current greenhouse gas emissions. So what are the 21 ways to leave your carbon?

As I was having lunch with Lee Baker at Fiddleheads Cafe in Hancock, one of the restaurant employees approached us with some grave news and a request: “There’s a huge dead bird in the parking lot,” she said, “and I thought, ‘Get Lee, he’ll know what to do!’” Lee and I put our lunch on hold and wa