Stewardship

The Reservation Stewardship Department is responsible for the management of the Forest Society’s fee-owned lands (over 56,000 acres, the Forest Society’s largest asset).   These lands are managed with a vision that is focused on the future, ensuring the biological richness of the state while providing economic and social returns to the organization, its members, and the public.

There’s an odd pleasure that comes from climbing on a tractor and mowing a field. You can measure your accomplishment of the task in the neat parallel tracks that the tractor lays out behind the bushhog.

This July, the Forest Society with partners at NH State Parks will host “Monadnock Trails Week” beginning Friday July 19 through Tuesday July 23 in Jaffrey.

When the Forest Society protected 200 acres on Mount Major in 2015, our fundraising slogan was “Everybody Hikes Mount Major.”  There has never been a more accurate campaign slogan, even in New Hampshire, home of the nation’s first primary. 

It is stunning, even for those who can’t quite imagine what it must be like to summit Mount Everest to see the recent pictures of climbers ascending the 29,000-foot peak in long lines that make it seem more like the line for Space Mountain at Disney World.

What could be a better metaphor for community connectedness than a group of individuals coming together to build a bridge?

For decades, environmentalists and public service agencies have attempted various slogans to teach people about the harm litter causes wildlife, water, and our environment and to ask more people to take personal responsibility. What will it take to stop our litter problem once and for all?

Since its early beginnings in 1993, the Forest Society Land Steward Program has been the volunteer backbone of our forest reservations. Each spring the Forest Society aims to recruit and train 25 new volunteers to join the program.

With more than 80,000 people hiking Mt. Major every year, the popular hiking spot has seen its share of excessive trash, damage to vegetation, trail erosion, disturbance to wildlife, and more. As a result, Mt. Major was chosen as one of 19 Hot Spots nationwide to be the focus of training from the Leave No Trace Center for Outdoor Ethics.