Volunteers

What could be a better metaphor for community connectedness than a group of individuals coming together to build a bridge?

For decades, environmentalists and public service agencies have attempted various slogans to teach people about the harm litter causes wildlife, water, and our environment and to ask more people to take personal responsibility. What will it take to stop our litter problem once and for all?

Since its early beginnings in 1993, the Forest Society Land Steward Program has been the volunteer backbone of our forest reservations. Each spring the Forest Society aims to recruit and train 25 new volunteers to join the program.

The Forest Society is currently recruiting new volunteer land stewards for a number of our Forest Reservations across the state!  

Do you like to hike off-trail in the woods?  Would you like to explore conservation properties and enjoy the challenge of navigating through the forest with a map and compass?  

If so, the Forest Society's Volunteer Easement Monitor Program (VEMP) may be a great fit for you!  

American Chestnut

The American chestnut is a large, monoecious deciduous tree of the beech family native to eastern North America. Before the species was devastated by the chestnut blight, a fungal disease, it was one of the most important forest trees throughout its range, and was considered the finest chestnut tree in the world.

Citizen science provides opportunities for volunteers to help with science research aimed at understanding the natural environment in New Hampshire.

Visitors to our forest reservations can contribute to environmental monitoring through digital photography with our Picture Posts. In addition, we train volunteers for long-term citizen science projects through partnerships with the American Chestnut Foundation and Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest.

As I was having lunch with Lee Baker at Fiddleheads Cafe in Hancock, one of the restaurant employees approached us with some grave news and a request: “There’s a huge dead bird in the parking lot,” she said, “and I thought, ‘Get Lee, he’ll know what to do!’” Lee and I put our lunch on hold and wa