Land Conservation

The Forest Society is New Hampshire's largest and oldest land trust. Visit this page to explore stories related to land conservation in New Hampshire.

Protecting New Hampshire's landscapes has been the driving force behind the Forest Society since it began in 1901. Our land conservation ethic is deeply rooted in protecting the state's most important landscapes while promoting the wise use of its renewable natural resources. Maintaining this balance has made the Forest Society one of the most effective land conservation organizations in the country, partnering with public agencies, communities, and private landowners to protect over one million acres in our first century.

Forest Society, NH Audubon, NH TNC and AMC all caution would-be hikers to seek out local conservation lands rather than the most popular spots in order to maintain distancing protocols.

The Moran easement puts in place one more piece of a puzzle in efforts by the Forest Society and its Q2C partners to build a continuous system of linked conservation lands protecting large blocks of land and allowing for the movement of plants and animals responding to a changing climate.

Creek Farm in Portsmouth, New Hampshire.

With the recent passing of 85-year-old Paul Bofinger, the State of New Hampshire lost a remarkable visionary, the Forest Society lost a former leader and others lost a valued mentor who had helped to shape the careers of leaders continuing to work in conservation-related fields of science, education, policy, forestry and philanthropy.

“The Forest Society has long recognized that one of the ways that our work protecting forests connects to people’s everyday lives is by providing clean drinking water,” said Jack Savage, president for the Forest Society.

The United States Senate will soon consider, possibly this week, the Great American Outdoors Act. If the legislation is ultimately signed into law, it will add to the growing impact the program has had on New Hampshire’s landscape.

For the last 27 years, the Forest Society has leaned on the assistance of community volunteers to monitor our conserved lands and help with special projects. Land Stewards form the backbone of our volunteer programs and are integral in meeting our mission.

There were so many acts of opposition, large and small, that wove a varied tapestry conveying the unmistakable message of resistance and tenacity.