Land Conservation

The Forest Society is New Hampshire's largest and oldest land trust. Visit this page to explore stories related to land conservation in New Hampshire.

Protecting New Hampshire's landscapes has been the driving force behind the Forest Society since it began in 1901. Our land conservation ethic is deeply rooted in protecting the state's most important landscapes while promoting the wise use of its renewable natural resources. Maintaining this balance has made the Forest Society one of the most effective land conservation organizations in the country, partnering with public agencies, communities, and private landowners to protect over one million acres in our first century.

The partial collapse of the famous stone staircase over the weekend attracted national attention.

The Forest Society is grateful to know LCHIP will continue to have resources to help protect these special places.

Known now as Clay Brook Forest, the protected property lies in the Taylor River watershed, less than a quarter mile from tidal waters and less than two miles from Hampton Bay.

Whether you're taking part in our Merrimack Paddle Challenge along the mighty Merrimack River or just planning to kayak in a local pond, it's important to recreate responsibly and safely this summer.

The Forest Society has expanded its Moose Mountains Reservation in Middleton and Brookfield, adding 171 acres to the already 2,575-acre reservation.

The Forest Society worked with the Cox Family to buy a conservation easement on a 36-acre parcel of land that was recently acquired by the family as an addition to Tuckaway Farm.

The virtual visits were part of the Land Trust Alliance's Advocacy Days.