Land Conservation

The Forest Society is New Hampshire's largest and oldest land trust. Visit this page to explore stories related to land conservation in New Hampshire.

Protecting New Hampshire's landscapes has been the driving force behind the Forest Society since it began in 1901. Our land conservation ethic is deeply rooted in protecting the state's most important landscapes while promoting the wise use of its renewable natural resources. Maintaining this balance has made the Forest Society one of the most effective land conservation organizations in the country, partnering with public agencies, communities, and private landowners to protect over one million acres in our first century.

MADBURY, DURHAM, LEE – Oct. 3, 2016 – The specter of a large subdivision replacing the forests along Route 155 in Madbury, Lee and Durham has helped the Powder Major’s Farm and Forest fundraising campaign to raise $67,000 in a $100,000 challenge matching grant issued by the Thomas W.

by Jack Savage

The upcoming generation, as represented by students in the Natural Resources department at the University of New Hampshire, thinks that we are insane. And they sound determined to make some changes.

TAMWORTH – June 24, 2014 –The Tamworth Conservation Commission and the Society for the Protection of New Hampshire Forests (Forest Society) are celebrating the conservation of two properties in Tamworth totaling 166 acres of land that will be protected forever from development and kept open for w

CONCORD – Sept. 16, 2014 – For the good of wildlife, working forests, productive farmland, and public access for fishing, hunting and other low-impact recreation, the Society for the Protection of N.H.

CONCORD – Nov. 5, 2014 – From around the nation and nearby, nearly 2,000 fans of Mt. Major donated to a fundraising campaign to buy land on and near the popular hiking destination, lifting the campaign to its $1.8 million goal.

 

CONCORD – Nov. 5, 2014 – The Society for the Protection of N.H. Forests (Forest Society) and the Washington Conservation Commission have conserved a 245-acre forest above Millen Lake in Washington.

Three of the many reasons Liz and Dennis Hager donated a conservation easement on their 140-acres in New Hampton are carved into an interior door of their farmhouse: I.H.M.

Steve Couture had just trekked across a field on snowshoes and come into full view of the Merrimack River in Hooksett when he stopped to look up, joking that it would be a perfect time for a bald eagle to fly over.

 None did.