Land Conservation

The Forest Society is New Hampshire's largest and oldest land trust. Visit this page to explore stories related to land conservation in New Hampshire.

Protecting New Hampshire's landscapes has been the driving force behind the Forest Society since it began in 1901. Our land conservation ethic is deeply rooted in protecting the state's most important landscapes while promoting the wise use of its renewable natural resources. Maintaining this balance has made the Forest Society one of the most effective land conservation organizations in the country, partnering with public agencies, communities, and private landowners to protect over one million acres in our first century.

Lost River Gorge & Boulder Caves, part of the Forest Society's Lost River Reservation, opened for the summer on June 13.

In an overwhelmingly bipartisan vote, the U.S. Senate recently approved the Great American Outdoors Act.

This week marks the 96th anniversary of the protection of Franconia Notch. We are the future generations that have benefited from the vision and action of our forebears.

Accept the #homehikechallenge and use the links below to help you find places near you to hike and recreate safely during COVID-19. Try both statewide agencies and land trusts as well as regional land trusts, and don't forget your own town. Most municipalities have some open lands or a town forest with hiking trails... check with your town's conservation commission or recreation department.

Nature is our ally during this difficult time. It has the power to soothe, uplift and restore. We are pleased to see people across the Granite State experiencing the restorative powers of a simple walk in the woods, and are equally pleased that most are heeding the message to enjoy those benefits locally and only when a place is not crowded.

We encourage you to #hikelocal, #walklocal and stay safe and healthy in the outdoors. Here are a few guidelines to share.

Forest Society, NH Audubon, NH TNC and AMC all caution would-be hikers to seek out local conservation lands rather than the most popular spots in order to maintain distancing protocols.

The Moran easement puts in place one more piece of a puzzle in efforts by the Forest Society and its Q2C partners to build a continuous system of linked conservation lands protecting large blocks of land and allowing for the movement of plants and animals responding to a changing climate.