Recreation

The Forest Society's mission includes conserving lands that provide recreational opportunities--and economic benefits through tourism--for New Hampshire residents and visitors. Visit this page to explore stories related to recreation on conserved lands.

Photo by Jerry Monkman
Our reservations are open to the public for many kinds of pedestrian recreation.

The Forest Society joined a broad coalition of groups calling for Congress to pass the Great American Outdoors Act.

Since the Berry family's winter hike two months ago, they have walked a lot of new trails — even if they've only made it halfway. And for the time being, they are grateful to be healthy and be outside.

We heard you! For the Forest Society's many members who are interested in viewing our Facebook Lunchtime Live episodes on a separate platform from social media, we have posted past Fireside Fridays and Virtual Field Trips here.

Check out our new Easement Lands Guide for even more outdoor recreation opportunities! The lands we've highlighted are Conservation Easement Properties on land owned by towns, other organizations or individuals.

Since mid-March, my family and I have been doing a lot of walking in the woods. Daily hikes on quiet, local trails have become our sanity in this constricted and complicated reality that we are living in.

Here are a few recommendations from the Forest Society’s staff for you to watch, read, and listen to now that we're all staying closer to home.

 

When a road trip north isn’t an option, Maria Finnegan relies on Nashua’s network of rail trails or takes a walk in a local park. Unfortunately, the Coronoavirus has made getting some fresh air a bit more complicated.

The golden eagle atop the NH State House dome in Concord isn't alone in the skies over the State Capitol. Photographer and naturalist Ellen Kenny recently captured images of a mature Bald Eagle catching a fish from the banks of the Merrimack River.