Forest Society History

There are so many amazing women involved with furthering the Forest Society's mission. This March, we highlight a few of these women and extend our appreciation to all women of the Forest Society and beyond.

A new archaeology study aims to date stone structures at Monson Center, a settlement constructed in the 1700s.

We fondly remember two long-time colleagues who recently passed away: Mary Beth Robinson and Trish Churchill.

The Forest Society recently completed the first phase of “Forest Society North,” a long-term plan to renovate and restore the landscape, facilities and program at The Rocks in Bethlehem, following the February 2019 fire which destroyed two historic buildings, the Tool Building and the Electric Plant.

The former Board of Trustees Chair made big ideas attainable with his soft-spoken leadership, including the establishment of the Trust for New Hampshire Lands.

With the recent passing of 85-year-old Paul Bofinger, the State of New Hampshire lost a remarkable visionary, the Forest Society lost a former leader and others lost a valued mentor who had helped to shape the careers of leaders continuing to work in conservation-related fields of science, education, policy, forestry and philanthropy.

There’s just something about the rural November landscape that whispers. It conveys a feeling of antiquity, a kind of sepia-toned memory as if the land itself remembers and projects a younger self-portrait; a time well before we called them “selfies.”

Jane Difley, the first female president of the Society for the Protection of New Hampshire Forests, is retiring on October 1, 2019, after 23 years. As a licensed forester, she has seen forest management evolve since she was a Forest Society intern in the 1970s.

Following the fire that destroyed the historic Tool Building and former Electric Plant used as a gift shop at the Rocks, messages and comments came streaming in.