Forest Society Blog - News & Features

It's been a HOT summer in New Hampshire. Statewde meteorologists track an average of 12 days of daytime high temperatures exceeding 90F degrees at the Concord, NH, weather reporting station.

For those inclined to head out to hiking trails in the next two months, the best is yet to come. September and October unquestionably offer the very best hiking conditions of the year: distant mountains in sharp relief under bright cobalt blue skies, lower humidity, few mosquitoes, no blackflies or deer flies, warm afternoons, cool mornings and evenings and spectacular autumn foliage colors.

Seacoast Online recently covered the ongoing construction at Carey Cottage, located at the Forest Society's Creek Farm Reservation. 

On August 4, the bipartisan Great American Outdoors Act was signed into law. That action crowns the efforts Land and Water Conservation Fund advocates, including the Forest Society, have been making over the last decade to fully fund the LWCF.

Contact your Executive Councilor in support of the nomination of Patrick Hackley as the next NH State Forester.

Raise your voice if you have concerns about future use of the Nash Stream Forest by August 20.

The parking lot at Mt. Major will be temporarily closed after Labor Day for about four weeks as the Forest Society improves the visitor experience by repairing drainage and erosion problems at the base of the Main (Blue) Trail.

Five years ago, when I found out my parents were moving to New Hampshire from Alaska — where I was born and raised — I had big plans for the outdoor adventures we’d have together.

"[T]his picturesque historic site, presided over since 1998 by the Society for the Protection of New Hampshire Forests, is a complicated collection of things lost and found in hardscrabble ground."