Forest Society Blog - News & Features

Senate Bill 74 aims to increase the amount of grants the New Hampshire Land and Community Heritage Investment Program (LCHIP) can award to projects that conserve and preserve our most impor

In an overwhelmingly large bipartisan vote of 92-8, the United States Senate on February 12 approved S. 47, the Natural Resources Management Act. The bill includes a wide-ranging set of provisions that will expand protections for our country’s natural areas.

On Saturday February 9, fifty hardy guests and forestry and education staff braved windy conditions to conduct a public timber harvest tour on a roughly 200 acre portion of the 1492 acre Forest Society Heald Tract in Wilton.

After the bitter cold at the end of January and the fresh snow that fell in many parts of the state, the woods came alive. Suddenly it seemed, there were animal tracks everywhere. A walk in the woods at my modest Tree Farm revealed a tapestry woven from the trails of leaps, bounds, walks and waddles.

In 2005, James and Cynthia Thorburn donated a conservation easement to the Forest Society on more than 25 acres of land in Hillsborough. In 2017, abutting land known as the McCabe property came up for sale. The Thorburns purchased the property in order to conserve much of the land.

Donald and Susan Ware are not strangers to conservation. In 2007, the couple donated a conservation easement on their 120 acres of land in Hopkinton to the Forest Society. In 2009, the couple acquired and added another 50.5 acres to the original conservation easement.

I recently shared my plan to retire in October 2019 with the Forest Society board, staff, and supporters. After 22 years, I’m ready to spend more time exploring the land the Forest Society has protected during my tenure here.

The Forest Society recently welcomed Jess Charpentier as a new Land Protection Specialist to the Land Protection Department.

The recent rescue of a great black hawk in Portland, Maine, has my imagination going wild.