Forest Society Blog - News & Features

By the time the cold weather months hit us, three of New Hampshire’s eight species of bats have already migrated to warmer places in the South and Mid-Atlantic regions.

The Rocks' Christmas Tree Farm will still be welcoming families and visitors this holiday for cut-your-own trees starting November 21, but to keep customers and staff as safe as possible will require advance reservations.

Owned by the Forest Society and leased by GoodWork, the historic Carey Cottage has its first nonprofit tenant after renovations were completed.

New Hampshire’s ever-changing weather and scenery drive the NH tourism economy and collective mood swings. Beyond the recent tumult of politics and pandemic, the forest offers an antidote: a sense of place, personality and yes, poetry.

Ellen Kenny shares her wildlife photos covering events both large and small occurring along Mill Brook in Concord on the Forest Society's Merrimack River Outdoor Education & Conservation Area.

The Forest Society recently submitted comments to the NH Division of Forests and Lands regarding the proposed 2020 New Hampshire Forest Action Plan, a 10-year strategic plan for New Hampshire's forests.

The Forest Society is part of the Northeast Forest Network (NFN), a coalition of organizations from across New England and New York who share a common mission of forest conservation, combating climate change, protecting clean air and water, and enhancing wildlife habitats.

The late September "autumnal equinox" brings days and nights into balance and equal length — but not for long. The beginning of autumn is a time when bird migrations peak as waves of warblers, then raptors — the hawks, falcons, eagles and ospreys — depart New England.

Throughout New Hampshire, fall hunting seasons are already underway. Sure, you could dust off your bow and try for a wild turkey hen, but there is another type of hen in our forests that is just as delicious and available for those who know how to hunt for it.