Creek Farm

Seacoast Online recently covered the ongoing construction at Carey Cottage, located at the Forest Society's Creek Farm Reservation. 

Where once-vast inland forests meet the rocky extremes of coastal rivers and shallow brackish, tidal estuaries, the combined effects of weather, past agriculture, development pressure and recently introduced landscape trees and aggressive invasive plants contribute to a kind of chaotic “Frankenst

Since acquiring the 35-acre property known as Creek Farm in 2000, the Society for the Protection of New Hampshire Forests (Forest Society) has worked to implement donor Lillian (“Billie”) Noel’s vision to have Creek Farm “maintained in an undeveloped state except as necessary for providing access

 “There is nothing – absolutely nothing – half so much worth doing as simply messing about in boats.” - Kenneth Grahame (The Wind in the Willows).  The Gundalow Company ‘River Rats’ and Discovery camps embrace the idea of spending time where the water meets the land.  During these week-l

Seacoast Walk Explores Estuary Botany with Dr. Gregg Moore

An ocean view seems fantastic on a sunny day, but as we’ve seen recently, coastal flooding can make shorefront living a dicey proposition. Ocean levels are rising, exacerbating extraordinary high tides and storm surges.

Trees have a funny way of getting ready for winter. Unlike people, who bundle up against the cold, deciduous trees sense the receding sunlight of shorter days and commence to get naked. And then they stay that way all winter long.