Working Forests

The Forest Society's mission includes perpetuating New Hampshire's forests through their 'wise use', or sustainable forestry. Working forests--those managed to provide a renewable wood resource--are more likely to remain as forests rather than being lost to development. Visit this page to explore stories and projects related to working forests.

The Reservation Stewardship Department is responsible for the management of the Forest Society’s fee-owned lands (over 56,000 acres, the Forest Society’s largest asset).   These lands are managed with a vision that is focused on the future, ensuring the biological richness of the state while providing economic and social returns to the organization, its members, and the public.

The Governor's decision to allow those employed in the forest products sector to continue to work will help the state recover from the damaging effects of the pandemic.

What are Forest Society foresters up to during the global pandemic? Manager Wendy Weisiger shares her "social distancing" strategy.

Researchers at Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest in North Woodstock have created experimental ice storm events similar to the Ice Storm of 1998 to better understand the stresses ice storms have on trees and forests.

The Forest Society plans to renovate the existing historic Carriage Barn at the Rocks as its new “Forest Society North” Conservation Center.

A recent modest snowstorm cancelled school. My son, Cody arrived with his future brother-in-law as a sugarhouse apprentice for an afternoon of learning while boiling sap.

One year after a devastating fire at The Rocks, the Forest Society announces plans for a major renovation project.

Dr. Natalie Cleavitt thinks New Hampshire’s sugar maples may be having trouble growing up.

At an October conference in Concord, the future of wood as a desirable structural framework for construction of large commercial buildings was presented as an ec