Conservation Easements

Conservation easements are forever. Since the early 1970s, the Forest Society has used conservation easements to protect 130,000 acres of important forest lands, water resources, scenic vistas, wildlife habitat and agricultural resources.

Conservation Easement Monitoring Report form for easements in which the Society for the Protection of New Hampshire Forests holds an executory interest.

Steve Couture had just trekked across a field on snowshoes and come into full view of the Merrimack River in Hooksett when he stopped to look up, joking that it would be a perfect time for a bald eagle to fly over.

 None did.

The Forest Society has a dedicated easement stewardship Defense Fund and a separate dedicated easement Stewardship Endowment to cover the ongoing, long-term costs associated with monitoring and managing our portfolio of conservation easements. 

An Executory Interest is a secondary or “back-up” easement holder of the easement in the land held by another conservation organization. The executory interest holder ensures that

We have four full-time easement stewards on staff, as well as an easement steward manager and coordinator who splits their time between land protection and stewardship. 
See the map below to determine which easement steward is the contact for your area and biographical information for each staff member at the bottom.

Garland Pond in Moultonborough, photo taken by Karen Foster

Conservation easements are forever. For every conservation easement the Forest Society accepts, we make a commitment to the landowner that we will protect the conservation values of their property forever.  Since the early 1970s, the Forest Society has used conservation easements to protect over 130,000 acres of important forest lands, water resources, scenic vistas, wildlife habitat and agricultural resources.