Forest Society Blog - News & Features

Birds are always spectacular in May. Now, more of us are actually watching and listening carefully. To quote Hall of Fame Baseball legend Yogi Berra: “You can observe a lot by watching."

The Lunchtime Live series is part of our ongoing initiative to keep you connected with the outdoors closer to home. It's now airing once a week as staff head back into the field for the summer months. You can see past virtual field trips, fireside Friday readings, and more here.

Since the Berry family's winter hike two months ago, they have walked a lot of new trails — even if they've only made it halfway. And for the time being, they are grateful to be healthy and be outside.

Check out our new Easement Lands Guide for even more outdoor recreation opportunities! The lands we've highlighted are Conservation Easement Properties on land owned by towns, other organizations or individuals.

Since mid-March, my family and I have been doing a lot of walking in the woods. Daily hikes on quiet, local trails have become our sanity in this constricted and complicated reality that we are living in.

Here are a few recommendations from the Forest Society’s staff for you to watch, read, and listen to now that we're all staying closer to home.

 

New Hampshire State Forester Brad Simpkins recently left the position in order to take a new job with the U.S. Forest Service’s Cooperative Fire Program in Durham.

Photographer Ellen Kenny is a frequent visitor to the Concord Merrimack River Outdoor Education and Conservation Area. She shares some recent observations and wildlife photographs.

Wood ducks are "dabbling" ducks: feeding on the surface of the water and not diving for food. They eat pond weeds, berries, seeds, aquatic insects and even acorns.