Working Forests

The Forest Society's mission includes perpetuating New Hampshire's forests through their 'wise use', or sustainable forestry. Working forests--those managed to provide a renewable wood resource--are more likely to remain as forests rather than being lost to development. Visit this page to explore stories and projects related to working forests.

Like many professions, forestry has developed over time its own specific vocabulary. Even forest management has a fancy name—silviculture—that doesn’t have anything to do with mining for precious metals.

There’s a great debate going on these days, in and out of the woods, over biomass. When it comes to the forest, biomass typically refers to wood harvested in the form of chips that are then burned, either to generate renewable electricity, or heat.

It’s not easy being a logger. Members of the public love to hate you for making what looks like a mess. Prices at the mill never seem to be good, the cost of fuel keeps going up, and the capital investment in the right equipment is substantial.

Certified Tree Farmer P.J. O’Rourke wrote an entertaining piece in the Wall Street Journal recently in which he attempts to explain why he owns land in New Hampshire. He concluded by noting , “ I can’t give up my estate….I’ve formed an inviolate bond with the land.

A boyhood discovery turns out to be the gift of a lifetime

The unmistakable scent of balsam was exotic to me when I was a boy, growing up on a street planted with ornamental hardwood trees in the crowded suburbs of northern New Jersey. The “Christmas tree smell” represented a …

What we learn from our elders if we make time to visit.

Do you remember the celebrated New York City “Survivor Tree?”

New Yorkers found the stub of an ornamental Callery Pear buried beneath the rubble of the World Trade Center towers after the September 11, 2001 …

With arm’s sweep, US Forest Service Research Forester Bill Leak gestured at the thick regeneration of beech, yellow birch, and sugar maple crowding a 30-year old clear-cut on the Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest and said, “The northern hardwood forest is Nature’s answer to armor-plating

Charley Hosmer shuffles out of his sugarhouse as I approach. He squints in curiosity and then relaxes in recognition. He ducks inside to check the boiling maple sap and I follow him. "How's it running?" I ask.

On the eve of the first measurable December snowfall, a time of thin ice and rattling beech leaves, I joined three colleagues on a rugged bushwhack to a remote corner of a Society-owned forest reservation. It's not often that the conservation business is as tangible as it was that early winter …