Working Forests

The Forest Society's mission includes perpetuating New Hampshire's forests through their 'wise use', or sustainable forestry. Working forests--those managed to provide a renewable wood resource--are more likely to remain as forests rather than being lost to development. Visit this page to explore stories and projects related to working forests.

Maple time in New England brings out the essence of the trees and the character in the people. For those who love trees, a tongue-tip taste of fresh maple syrup is a sacrament, maple communion at the end of a long winter.

WHEN Europeans began colonizing New England centuries ago, no sooner had they set foot on shore than they began re-creating the villages they knew from home across the sea.

In New Hampshire, forests cover 4.8 million acres. That's 84 percent of the state, as anyone who has flown over it can attest. Northern hardwoods - beech, birch and maple - make up more than 53 percent of statewide forest cover.

On the first warm April afternoon, Colby-Sawyer College students gathered maple sap from buckets and fed wood into the fire roaring beneath boiling sap pans in the college’s maple sugarhouse.

Maple syrup—the making and the marketing of it—is at once as simple as can be and surprisingly complicated.

Loaded logging trucks: We see them all the time on New Hampshire’s roads and highways. Have you ever wondered where all those logs are headed?

Forwarder in action sustainable forestry in New Hampshire
A machine called a "forwarder" in action on Blaine Forest in Jaffrey, NH.

By their nature, and by the nature of their work, foresters oftimes spend their days alone and in the woods.  That’s not a problem; foresters like wandering and either talking to themselves or to the trees.  There isn’t much need of a loud voice unless some absent-minded bear lopes by or they’re …