Working Forests

The Forest Society's mission includes perpetuating New Hampshire's forests through their 'wise use', or sustainable forestry. Working forests--those managed to provide a renewable wood resource--are more likely to remain as forests rather than being lost to development. Visit this page to explore stories and projects related to working forests.

The Society for the Protection of New Hampshire Forests was honored with the Integrity in Conservation Award from the New England Society of American Foresters today in Nashua. President/Forester Jane Difley accepted the award on behalf of the Forest Society.

If beech trees could read, they might wonder what the heck they ever did to deserve the recent headlines decrying their growth. “Beech trees take over northeastern U.S.

You’ve seen slogans on pick-up truck bumpers or wood chip trailers: “Got Wood?” or “Local Wood, Local Good.”  You don’t think twice about trucks on NH highways hauling logs heading for sawmills or tractor trailer loads of wood chips destined to generate electricity.

In February of 2018, the Forest Society began a harvest on the western side of Mount Monadnock.  The goal of this harvest is to cut high-quality red oak trees that have attained maturity and provide an opportunity for new oaks

White Pine, Blue Stain

After a wind storm, how long do fallen white pine logs last?

Two centuries ago, New England forests were in the midst of significant change. European settlement up to that point had already led to widespread deforestation, for heat, timber export, homebuilding and agricultural clearing.

During a March storm, strong winds toppled mature pine trees on our Whittemore Reservation in Lyndeborough.  The forest had recently been the site of a shelterwood harvest, a type of

Though I do not believe that a plant will spring up where no seed has been, I have great faith in a seed. Convince me that you have a seed there, and I am prepared to expect wonders.” - Henry D. Thoreau from earlier work published in 1993 as Faith in a Seed

The specter of drought is often raised in these early days of summer. And for good reason, though water levels have returned to normal around New Hampshire, state officials are still warning residents to remain cautious after last summer's drought.