Working Forests

The Forest Society's mission includes perpetuating New Hampshire's forests through their 'wise use', or sustainable forestry. Working forests--those managed to provide a renewable wood resource--are more likely to remain as forests rather than being lost to development. Visit this page to explore stories and projects related to working forests.

After a recent timber harvest at Weeks Woods in Gilford, volunteers and staff teamed-up to build two new hiking trail bridges and to seed-down portions of skid trails with rye grass seed as part of putting the timber sale to bed and improving the hiking trail network.  The hiking trails had been

The Forest Society is conducting a timber harvest on the western side of the lower slopes of Mount Monadnock.

Remember the TV show The A-Team, in which the cigar-chewing hero John “Hannibal” Smith says: “I love it when a plan comes together”?  Faced with a challenge, he would develop a plan, execute that plan under much adversity and by the end of the hour-long show put a big grin on his face and spout …

Encouraging results after a fall 2014 seed tree cut

The Open Journal of Forestry published an article last week that examines some of the effects that whole-tree harvesting has on northern hardwood forests.

In August, NH towns celebrate "Old Home Days." Forest Society founders, Frank Rollins and Nahum Batchelder conceived "Old Home Week” in 1899. It was designed to lure wealth back to NH to revitalize depressed rural economies and bring abandoned farms back onto tax rolls.

In New Hampshire, forests cover 4.8 million acres. That's 84 percent of the state, as anyone who has flown over it can attest. Northern hardwoods - beech, birch and maple - make up more than 53 percent of statewide forest cover.