Working Forests

The Forest Society's mission includes perpetuating New Hampshire's forests through their 'wise use', or sustainable forestry. Working forests--those managed to provide a renewable wood resource--are more likely to remain as forests rather than being lost to development. Visit this page to explore stories and projects related to working forests.

A recent modest snowstorm cancelled school. My son, Cody arrived with his future brother-in-law as a sugarhouse apprentice for an afternoon of learning while boiling sap.

One year after a devastating fire at The Rocks, the Forest Society announces plans for a major renovation project.

Dr. Natalie Cleavitt thinks New Hampshire’s sugar maples may be having trouble growing up.

At an October conference in Concord, the future of wood as a desirable structural framework for construction of large commercial buildings was presented as an ec

By just four votes, the New Hampshire House of Representatives fell short of overriding the Governor’s veto of House Bill 183. If approved, the legislation would have provided support to New Hampshire's six independent wood energy power plants. 

Jane Difley, the first female president of the Society for the Protection of New Hampshire Forests, is retiring on October 1, 2019, after 23 years. As a licensed forester, she has seen forest management evolve since she was a Forest Society intern in the 1970s.

On the forestland owned by the Society for the Protection of New Hampshire Forests, the timber is growing in age, in volume, and value every year.

Every ten years, the Department of Natural and Cultural Resources (DNCR) reassesses the statewide Forest Action Plan.