Wildlife

The Forest Society's mission includes conserving land that supports New Hampshire's native animals and plants, so that wildlife remains a part of our everyday world. Visit this page to explore stories, projects and stewardship related to wildlife and habitat.

A perfectly clear, 'bluebird day" greeted particpants arriving to hike with Sue Morse of Keeping Track at The Fells in mid-February.

Figuratively speaking, Northern harriers have largely stayed out of sight, and out of mind of wildlife managers... even though their populations across New England have been on the decline for decades.

Snow season has arrived in New Hampshire’s forests opening a window of opportunity for tracking winter wildlife. The tracking season lasts reliably for four months, perhaps less as winters become more erratic and annual snowfall decreases, from late November until late March.

In November …

If you live near a patch of forest or hang a backyard feeder in winter, you’ve probably got a few black-capped chickadees (Poecile atricapillus) flitting around outside as you read this.

Something Wild is joint production of NH Audubon, The Society for the Protection of New Hampshire Forests & NHPR.

When you imagine a forest that is full of wildlife, you may imagine a forest that consists of really old and large trees. However, the largest diversity of wildlife will be found in dense thickets with trees no older than ten years old!

Winter Wildlife Education Events with Susan Morse
 

North Country

New Hampshire is a pretty cool place. There are mountains, rivers, lakes, oceans, and a lot of trees. NH is over 80% forested (83% currently as measured by USDA Forest Service), but it hasn’t always been that way.

Standing dead trees (often called snags) are common in our forests, and it’s hard to overstate just how vital a role they play in a healthy ecosystem.