Wildlife

The Forest Society's mission includes conserving land that supports New Hampshire's native animals and plants, so that wildlife remains a part of our everyday world. Visit this page to explore stories, projects and stewardship related to wildlife and habitat.

Something Wild is joint production of NH Audubon, The Society for the Protection of New Hampshire Forests & NHPR.

When you imagine a forest that is full of wildlife, you may imagine a forest that consists of really old and large trees. However, the largest diversity of wildlife will be found in dense thickets with trees no older than ten years old!

Winter Wildlife Education Events with Susan Morse
 

North Country

New Hampshire is a pretty cool place. There are mountains, rivers, lakes, oceans, and a lot of trees. NH is over 80% forested (83% currently as measured by USDA Forest Service), but it hasn’t always been that way.

Standing dead trees (often called snags) are common in our forests, and it’s hard to overstate just how vital a role they play in a healthy ecosystem.

There’s just something about the rural November landscape that whispers. It conveys a feeling of antiquity, a kind of sepia-toned memory as if the land itself remembers and projects a younger self-portrait; a time well before we called them “selfies.”

Enjoy photos from our 2019 Annual Meeting. Members and guest enjoyed summit views from Pine Mountain to a pontoon ride with the Forest Society's new President, Jack Savage.

Autumn in New Hampshire is a wonderful time to watch and observe some easily recognizable stages of natural cycles: hawks migrating, leaves changing color…bears fattening up as they get ready to hibernate.

Our fenced-in backyard orchard includes apples, peaches and pears. Outside the wire mesh fence corralling the semi-dwarf fruit trees are a few ancient, standard apple trees. Translation: much taller trees.