Wildlife

The Forest Society's mission includes conserving land that supports New Hampshire's native animals and plants, so that wildlife remains a part of our everyday world. Visit this page to explore stories, projects and stewardship related to wildlife and habitat.

April pulls the same dirty tricks every year — particularly after we relax or let our guard down at the end of winter. A few decent days, then April delivers a gut-punch: swirling snow, sleet and freezing temperatures under gray skies.

Finally.

So much of New Hampshire’s natural beauty is obvious; from the top of a mountain trail, from the shore of a lake or pond, even from your kitchen window. You barely have to open your eyes to see it. But take a closer look, and beauty gives way to scientific wonder.

NEWBURY -- Master wildlife tracker Sue Morse smiled comfortably as adult students lashed on their snowshoes and slung daypacks on their backs in anticipation of a guided animal tracking group hike.

After the bitter cold at the end of January and the fresh snow that fell in many parts of the state, the woods came alive. Suddenly it seemed, there were animal tracks everywhere. A walk in the woods at my modest Tree Farm revealed a tapestry woven from the trails of leaps, bounds, walks and waddles.

The recent rescue of a great black hawk in Portland, Maine, has my imagination going wild.

The Heald Tract Reservation in Wilton will have a timber harvest operation in the winter of 2018-19 that includes prescriptions to remove overstory trees to regenerate understory shrubs - specifically mountain laurel - that can greatly enhance cover for wildlife.   The specific goal for improving

Winter is hands down my favorite season for hiking. I may be in the minority on this, but there are some real advantages to winter. No biting insects is a big advantage as far as I’m concerned. I’m the person who gets swarmed if there are biting insects. 

The diversity of New Hampshire’s habitats is staggering, as we’ve mentioned in the past there are more than 200 natural communities within our borders. This week, in another edition of New Hampshire’s Wild Neighborhoods Something Wild, again visits a rare habitat type.