Wildlife

The Forest Society's mission includes conserving land that supports New Hampshire's native animals and plants, so that wildlife remains a part of our everyday world. Visit this page to explore stories, projects and stewardship related to wildlife and habitat.

The golden eagle atop the NH State House dome in Concord isn't alone in the skies over the State Capitol. Photographer and naturalist Ellen Kenny recently captured images of a mature Bald Eagle catching a fish from the banks of the Merrimack River.

Eggs are a perennial symbol of Easter and Passover. No coincidence. The season of rebirth begins with breeding seasons and eggs containing the embryonic continuance of life.

Something Wild is joint production of NH Audubon, The Society for the Protection of New Hampshire Forests & NHPR.

We recommend listening to it in it's original format but a transcript of the show is also below.

Late winter sunshine strengthens, days grow warm and snowmelt accelerates in the northern half of New Hampshire. South-facing slopes open-up early. Acorn-producing red oak trees grow best on steep, well-drained south and west-facing slopes.

Something Wild is joint production of NH Audubon, The Society for the Protection of New Hampshire Forests & NHPR.

A perfectly clear, 'bluebird day" greeted particpants arriving to hike with Sue Morse of Keeping Track at The Fells in mid-February.

Figuratively speaking, Northern harriers have largely stayed out of sight, and out of mind of wildlife managers... even though their populations across New England have been on the decline for decades.

Snow season has arrived in New Hampshire’s forests opening a window of opportunity for tracking winter wildlife. The tracking season lasts reliably for four months, perhaps less as winters become more erratic and annual snowfall decreases, from late November until late March.

In November …

If you live near a patch of forest or hang a backyard feeder in winter, you’ve probably got a few black-capped chickadees (Poecile atricapillus) flitting around outside as you read this.