Timber Harvesting

To reinvigorate the white-pine dominant forest at the Forest Society's Whittemore Reservation in Lyndeborough, the Forest Society started a timber harvest in November.  Licensed forester Eric Radloff of Bay State Forestry is administering the harvest, and loggers from HHP, a forest products compa

I first met the logger “Brad” back in May during a pre-timber harvest hike with the forester for my neighbor’s woodlot. The pines and hemlocks to be cut were marked with blue paint slashes by the forester, Brooks Weathers.

Saturday, October 22, 2016 - 9:00am

Join Forest Society professional forestry staff for a tour of the recently-completed timber harvest at the Weeks Woods.  Hear about the Forest Society's management plans and long-term goals for this working woodlot. Learn more about which trees were cut, how they were harvested and what the objectives of the harvest were. Learn about the ‘patch cutting’ and ‘shelterwood’ techniques and why these particular harvest systems and logging equipment were selected for this property. Which trees were marked for harvest and why? What wood products were produced?

Many people don't think of trees when we speak of "harvest." Corn is harvested; apples, tomatoes, squash are the fruits of the annual autumnal rite which is the province of our farmers.

The Forest Society is conducting a timber harvest on the western side of the lower slopes of Mount Monadnock.

Remember the TV show The A-Team, in which the cigar-chewing hero John “Hannibal” Smith says: “I love it when a plan comes together”?  Faced with a challenge, he would develop a plan, execute that plan under much adversity and by the end of the hour-long show put a big grin on his face and spout …

The Open Journal of Forestry published an article last week that examines some of the effects that whole-tree harvesting has on northern hardwood forests.

A Logging Life – Planning, Purpose and Pride

In New Hampshire, forests cover 4.8 million acres. That's 84 percent of the state, as anyone who has flown over it can attest. Northern hardwoods - beech, birch and maple - make up more than 53 percent of statewide forest cover.