Recreation

The Forest Society's mission includes conserving lands that provide recreational opportunities--and economic benefits through tourism--for New Hampshire residents and visitors. Visit this page to explore stories related to recreation on conserved lands.

Something in the sudden acute awareness of slanting, September sunlight, standing amid fallen crimson maple leaves and with long-faded hopes for a Red Sox pennant bid aggravates my annual autumn lament. Despite fall foliage which will again be absolutely gorgeous, I remain vexed.

Today’s topic is perfect for the fall season: cleaning up the leaves. Yes, it’s that time of year again, and if you hate raking as much as we do, we’ve got some good news for you. It really doesn’t have to be so…well…impulsive.

October is a Goldilocks month. It's neither too hot, nor too cold; no hazy humidity, no bugs, no snow… or at least no appreciable accumulation is likely. Warm cobalt-blue sky afternoons and cool wood smoke evenings are perfect for ascending New Hampshire’s famed summits to admire the foliage.

Changing Landscapes

New Hampshire is unusually well endowed with forests and sparkling waters. We enjoy walking, hiking, picnicking, hunting, and working on our lands. Products from the forests and farmland nourish and shelter us. Open space sustains our economy and our culture.

The landscapes of New Hampshire help define and enrich our quality of life.

Since 1901, the Society for the Protection of New Hampshire Forests has worked to conserve the state's most important landscapes and promote wise use of its renewable natural resources. The Forest Society is New Hampshire's oldest and largest non-profit land conservation organization.