Land Conservation

The Forest Society is New Hampshire's largest and oldest land trust. Visit this page to explore stories related to land conservation in New Hampshire.

With the recent passing of 85-year-old Paul Bofinger, the State of New Hampshire lost a remarkable visionary, the Forest Society lost a former leader and others lost a valued mentor who had helped to shape the careers of leaders continuing to work in conservation-related fields of science, education, policy, forestry and philanthropy.

“The Forest Society has long recognized that one of the ways that our work protecting forests connects to people’s everyday lives is by providing clean drinking water,” said Jack Savage, president for the Forest Society.

The United States Senate will soon consider, possibly this week, the Great American Outdoors Act. If the legislation is ultimately signed into law, it will add to the growing impact the program has had on New Hampshire’s landscape.

For the last 27 years, the Forest Society has leaned on the assistance of community volunteers to monitor our conserved lands and help with special projects. Land Stewards form the backbone of our volunteer programs and are integral in meeting our mission.

There were so many acts of opposition, large and small, that wove a varied tapestry conveying the unmistakable message of resistance and tenacity.

Support the Forest Society in February by voting online and we could win a grant from the Bangor Savings Bank Foundation's Community Matters More initiative. 

CONCORD, N.H. (Oct. 18, 2019)— At the Society for the Protection of New Hampshire Forests’ 118th Annual Meeting held in September, the organization appointed five new members to the Board of Trustees.

Concord, N.H. (Oct. 18, 2019) - At the Society for the Protection of New Hampshire Forests Annual Meeting, the organization presents its Conservationist of the Year Award.