Land Conservation

The Forest Society is New Hampshire's largest and oldest land trust. Visit this page to explore stories related to land conservation in New Hampshire.

One thing I love about working for the Society for the Protection of New Hampshire Forests (Forest Society) is the variety of situations that I encounter. As a conservation easement steward, I spend a lot of time in the woods or behind a computer screen, but I never know what to expect.

PETERBOROUGH, N.H. —The Society for the Protection of New Hampshire Forests (Forest Society) is pleased to annoounce the conservation of 85 acres in Peterborough.

Manchester Water Works (MWW) and the Society for the Protection of New Hampshire Forests (Forest Society) worked together to permanently conserve 1,942 acres surrounding Tower Hill Pond in Candia and Hooksett.

Not long ago I had no idea what conservation actually meant. I submitted an online volunteer application to the Forest Society and heard back right away. I never would have guessed (but might have hoped) that a simple offer to help could eventually turn into a career.

Saturday, April 6, 2019 - 9:00am

At the upcoming Saving Special Places Conference, seven different Forest Society staff members are helping to deliver conservation-related workshops. The keynote is by Jameson French, former Forest Society Board Chair and nationwide leader in progressive forestry and forest conservation.  We hope you will join our staff and partners on Saturday April 6 from 9 am to 4 pm at Prospect Mountain Regional High School in Alton.

To learn more visit the conference website: https://savingspecialplaces.org/

After a thorough review of the Forest Society’s land protection and stewardship policies and procedures, the national Land Trust Accreditation Commission renewed the Forest Society’s coveted status as an accredited land trust.

In 2005, James and Cynthia Thorburn donated a conservation easement to the Forest Society on more than 25 acres of land in Hillsborough. In 2017, abutting land known as the McCabe property came up for sale. The Thorburns purchased the property in order to conserve much of the land.

Donald and Susan Ware are not strangers to conservation. In 2007, the couple donated a conservation easement on their 120 acres of land in Hopkinton to the Forest Society. In 2009, the couple acquired and added another 50.5 acres to the original conservation easement.

I recently shared my plan to retire in October 2019 with the Forest Society board, staff, and supporters. After 22 years, I’m ready to spend more time exploring the land the Forest Society has protected during my tenure here.