Clean Water

Forests are nature's water filter. The Forest Society's mission includes conserving land that keeps our waters clean and cool for human and wildlife consumption. Visit this page to explore stories, projects and stewardship related to sustaining our supply of clean water in New Hampshire.

Manchester Water Works (MWW) and the Society for the Protection of New Hampshire Forests (Forest Society) worked together to permanently conserve 1,942 acres surrounding Tower Hill Pond in Candia and Hooksett.

As I sit at my computer in a wool hat with a blanket on my lap, I’m forced to remind myself that winter isn’t official until Friday. Say what? I recall Jack Frost’s frequent visits as of late that make designs on my porch windows. My mind wanders to our depleting cord word supply.

On October 1, the New Hampshire Drinking Water and Groundwater Trust Fund Commission awarded $2.4 million for 15 water supply land protection projects.  Among those projects funded were Parker Farms Easement in Auburn and the Stillhouse Forest in Canterbury and Northfield. 

We are working with videographer Jerry Monkman on a documentary film about the Merrimack river and its watershed, the health of which will be critical to our future livelihood.

“I’ll bet a kid from rural Africa could teach you a thing or two about making things out of trees” my colleague said.

It's true. 

It seems like this first half of April, now in the rearview mirror, has given us many mornings of sub-freezing temperatures and grey, brooding skies.  Despite the chill though, mornings on the floodplain have been ringing with birdsong  that grows daily in variety.  Walking the Conservation Cente

Passover on the Jewish Calendar, Holy week on the Christian Calendar, Muskrat Week on the Floodplain Calendar.

Water is what has allowed life to generate and regenerate on this tiny blue marble of ours. Most of us would shrivel up and blow away without a water supply. And yet every year at this time water becomes scarce, surface water anyway.