Wildlife

The Forest Society's mission includes conserving land that supports New Hampshire's native animals and plants, so that wildlife remains a part of our everyday world. Visit this page to explore stories, projects and stewardship related to wildlife and habitat.

Spring ephemeral is the term used for many of New Hampshire's wildflowers that show off in the spring and then move on to a different life cycle where they wither away back underground after going through a reproductive phase. The short definition is growing over a short amount of time.

Birds are always spectacular in May. Now, more of us are actually watching and listening carefully. To quote Hall of Fame Baseball legend Yogi Berra: “You can observe a lot by watching."

Since mid-March, my family and I have been doing a lot of walking in the woods. Daily hikes on quiet, local trails have become our sanity in this constricted and complicated reality that we are living in.

Photographer Ellen Kenny is a frequent visitor to the Concord Merrimack River Outdoor Education and Conservation Area. She shares some recent observations and wildlife photographs.

Wood ducks are "dabbling" ducks: feeding on the surface of the water and not diving for food. They eat pond weeds, berries, seeds, aquatic insects and even acorns.

The golden eagle atop the NH State House dome in Concord isn't alone in the skies over the State Capitol. Photographer and naturalist Ellen Kenny recently captured images of a mature Bald Eagle catching a fish from the banks of the Merrimack River.

Eggs are a perennial symbol of Easter and Passover. No coincidence. The season of rebirth begins with breeding seasons and eggs containing the embryonic continuance of life.

Something Wild is joint production of NH Audubon, The Society for the Protection of New Hampshire Forests & NHPR.

We recommend listening to it in it's original format but a transcript of the show is also below.

Late winter sunshine strengthens, days grow warm and snowmelt accelerates in the northern half of New Hampshire. South-facing slopes open-up early. Acorn-producing red oak trees grow best on steep, well-drained south and west-facing slopes.