Wildlife

The Forest Society's mission includes conserving land that supports New Hampshire's native animals and plants, so that wildlife remains a part of our everyday world. Visit this page to explore stories, projects and stewardship related to wildlife and habitat.

Winter is hands down my favorite season for hiking. I may be in the minority on this, but there are some real advantages to winter. No biting insects is a big advantage as far as I’m concerned. I’m the person who gets swarmed if there are biting insects. 

The diversity of New Hampshire’s habitats is staggering, as we’ve mentioned in the past there are more than 200 natural communities within our borders. This week, in another edition of New Hampshire’s Wild Neighborhoods Something Wild, again visits a rare habitat type.

The Commission to Study the Efficiency and Effectiveness of the Fish and Game Department Operations released its final on November 20, 2018.  The Commission members did not reach a consensus on the actions needed to strengthen the Department’s capacity to carry out its mission.  Instead, the repo

As we hunker down for the winter weather, we’re frequently too preoccupied with what is in our front yards that we tend not to notice what isn’t there. The snow and ice have muscled out the grass, and the chilly sounds of the north wind have blown away the dawn chorus that woke us this summer.

Andy Deegan was filling birdfeeders and letting the dog out in the early morning gloom when he encountered what he thought might be “the biggest squirrel I’ve ever heard” scrambling up a large white pine just outside his New London home.  It turned out to be a bear cub - an orphan.

Winter is always the lean time of the year, but this winter especially, biologists are expecting scarcity for all sorts of forest dwellers: birds, rodents and larger mammals.

Forest Society’s Harmon Preserve

Management plans for the Dr. Melvin A. Harmon Preserve in Freedom: The 334-acre Harmon Preserve was protected by the Forest Society in 1999 with plans to manage it for its globally imperiled pitch pine - scrub oak natural community.

Saturday, June 29, 2019 - 10:00am
PortsmouthNH

Learn the common names of popular tree species on a gentle stroll.  We will take a second look at leaf evidence, bark, buds, seeds, and more to assist in identification. Meet Henry, the Center for Wildlife’s non-releasable North American porcupine ambassador and learn about Henry’s favorite foods like black birch, oak, hemlock, maple, and of course acorns! Program and walk open to all ages.

When: Saturday, June 29, 2019

Time: 10:00 a.m. - 11:00 a.m.

Location: Creek Farm, 400 Little Harbor Rd, Portsmouth, NH

We started the day on Appledore Island, just outside Portsmouth Harbor. The Shoals Marine Lab, resident there, traces its history back to 1928. Among the biologists spending the summer there this year were Dr. Elizabeth Craig, Tern Conservation Program Manager.