Wildlife

The Forest Society's mission includes conserving land that supports New Hampshire's native animals and plants, so that wildlife remains a part of our everyday world. Visit this page to explore stories, projects and stewardship related to wildlife and habitat.

By September, forests are bone dry. Brushy unmowed fields and woodland edges are cloaked in goldenrod, Queen Anne’s lace and woodland asters. When dusty leaves of poison ivy and wild grape vines display the first crimson or gold tinges of autumn, underground “yellow-jacket” hornet nests reach …

"How come we never seem to see many animals when we’re hiking?”

It’s a familiar lament from those who wish to get more out of precious free time enjoying the peace of the forest and freedom of the hills. I’ve got a few time-tested and simple tips to help maximize your chances to …

Here at Something Wild, we’ve been thinking a lot about winter and the different strategies animals use to get through these cold, harsh months. There are quite a few techniques to survive winter if you don’t live in a toasty house with central heating or a roaring wood stove.

Doing the laundry at my house in early winter always includes a strange ritual on the way to the washer and dryer in the cellar: Stop at the bottom of the cellar stairs, gaze at the mishmash of wires and water pump pipes along the old foundation wall and – occasionally -- exclaim, “Oh, there you

Early one morning last week, I finally caught the mouse.

I was asked recently if I knew the largest rodent in North America. My first thought was my great uncle Wally, who was known for his ability to gnaw his way through a casino-sized buffet and darn near qualified as a full load when he climbed into his half-ton pickup.

To the Thawing Wind

"Come with rain, O loud Southwester! Bring the singer, bring the nester…" - Robert Frost, from A Boy's Will 1913

Weary of hauling maple, ash and oak to the woodstove by late winter, I pass beneath a fragile nest of moss and mud perched in the eaves of the …

The crew grew quiet as we approached the nest. They whispered and walked slowly, carefully scanning the tree tops overhead and behind them. At the snap of a dry twig underfoot, a goshawk leaped from the rim of its nest and screamed "Kak! Kak! Kak!" as it circled above the pines. I froze …