Wildlife

The Forest Society's mission includes conserving land that supports New Hampshire's native animals and plants, so that wildlife remains a part of our everyday world. Visit this page to explore stories, projects and stewardship related to wildlife and habitat.

Fawn season is early June in New Hampshire Forests.

“Whoa, that’s not a pine cone!”

WALKING in New Hampshire woods, I'm usually looking up and looking out. Tall trees, flitting birds overhead and the possibility of dozing deer or a bounding bear keep my chin up.

Tom Brady stopped by for a visit last week. Or, rather, it seemed like Tom Brady stopped by. It was really much more exciting: A bobcat sauntered around right outside our office here at the Concord neighborhood home of the Conservation Center.

We first found the deer carcass by simply listening. A raucous chorus of crows and a few smaller blue jays seemed suspicious in February.

Walking amid clouds of swarming insects, a bird suddenly flushes from underfoot in thick vegetation along a trail. I draw a bead on that spot and step lightly.

Carefully woven, a local tapestry of territories lies tattered and torn. 

Bereft of song; obsolete and forlorn.

Each winter, when I find myself occasionally longing for the warmer weather of summer, I try to remember about deer flies.

In which a groundhog predicts not only the remaining length of winter, but the outcome of Northern Pass.