Wildlife

The Forest Society's mission includes conserving land that supports New Hampshire's native animals and plants, so that wildlife remains a part of our everyday world. Visit this page to explore stories, projects and stewardship related to wildlife and habitat.

Got snow? That's probably a sore subject for many in New England this time of year, but in the woods, snow is not an enemy--a scourge to be shoveled, scraped and plowed out of the way. In nature, snow is a trusted ally to plants and wildlife.

If Valentine's Day alone were not a slippery slope, consider this question: Muskrat Love?

A little phoebe nest is tucked beneath the rafters in my backyard woodshed like a miniature wreath. It’s a curious little relic to behold during those long, cold snowy weeks of hauling winter cordwood. By May, it once more cradles eggs and tiny nestlings.

Twenty five years ago, bald eagles and peregrine falcons were struggling to return from the brink of extinction. A handful of outdated surveys were all that existed to assess the location and condition of most wildlife species.

Here's a dubious Granite State superlative: New Hampshire has the third highest incidence of Lyme disease in the country following Delaware and Connecticut!

Fawn season is early June in New Hampshire Forests.

Tom Brady stopped by for a visit last week. Or, rather, it seemed like Tom Brady stopped by. It was really much more exciting: A bobcat sauntered around right outside our office here at the Concord neighborhood home of the Conservation Center.

We first found the deer carcass by simply listening. A raucous chorus of crows and a few smaller blue jays seemed suspicious in February.

Walking amid clouds of swarming insects, a bird suddenly flushes from underfoot in thick vegetation along a trail. I draw a bead on that spot and step lightly.