Forest Society Blog - News & Features

The Trees for Troops program gets donated trees from farmers, businesses, and individuals throughout the country. The trees are donated to military bases around the country as well as to some bases overseas. The Rocks is the gathering point for VT and NH donations.

New Hampshire is a pretty cool place. There are mountains, rivers, lakes, oceans, and a lot of trees. NH is over 80% forested (83% currently as measured by USDA Forest Service), but it hasn’t always been that way.

Volunteer Land Steward George Beaton, of Bradford, was recently recognized at the Spirit of New Hampshire Volunteer Awards, an annual event organized by Volunteer NH.  The Forest Society nominated George for this honor for his outstanding volunteer efforts on many fronts: monitoring and stewardin

The Society for the Protection of New Hampshire Forests applauds Congresswoman Anne Kuster for her introduction of Legislation to Protect Conserved Lands Act. Cong.

It’s officially stick season, and while there may be less green in the woods at this time of year, that can sometimes be a good thing.  Late fall and winter is a time when I tend to notice different things in the forest, things that have always been there, but now they jump out at me without the

The Clay Brook Forest adjacent to wetlands along Clay Brook and the Taylor River in Hampton Falls provided a perfect, natural outdoor classroom setting for local 8th grade students to explore topics including tree identification, wildlife habitats, wetlands and local land use history and contempo

Standing dead trees (often called snags) are common in our forests, and it’s hard to overstate just how vital a role they play in a healthy ecosystem.

BETHLEHEM — While still recovering from a fire earlier this year that destroyed its historic Tool Building, The Rocks Estate is nonetheless ready to greet visitors for another holiday season, with cut-your-own Christmas trees resuming on Nov. 23.

 

There’s just something about the rural November landscape that whispers. It conveys a feeling of antiquity, a kind of sepia-toned memory as if the land itself remembers and projects a younger self-portrait; a time well before we called them “selfies.”