Forest Reservation Guide

Welcome to our Forest Reservation Guide. You can browse our properties using the map, or scroll down to filter by region or recreational activity. Featured reservations (blue pins) typically have parking areas, mapped trails, and more detailed information. All our Forest Reservations are open to the public. You can also search by Reservation name or town.

 
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  • This generous gift of land ensures the permanent protection of one of the state’s largest mostly undeveloped lakes (234 acres). This reservation surrounding Grafton Pond was the gift of an anonymous donor who wanted to preserve the wilderness pond and its seven miles of shoreline as one of the remaining sanctuaries for nesting loons.

    • Birdwatching
    • Cross-country Skiing
    • Family-oriented
    • Fishing
    • Hiking Trails
    • Hunting
    • Paddling (canoeing / kayaking)
    • Snowmobiling
  • Lake Sunapee from Sunset Hill at the Forest Society's Hay Reservation in Newbury

    More than 100 years ago, the rugged natural beauty of Land Sunapee’s shores inspired American author and diplomat John M. Hay to build a summer retreat in Newbury. John Hay had been a private secretary to Abraham Lincoln and secretary of state under two presidents (William McKinley and Theodore Roosevelt).

    • Cross-country Skiing
    • Dog-walking
    • Hiking Trails
    • Hunting
    • Snowshoeing
  • The name “Cockermouth Forest” has historical significance in that from 1760 to 1790 the town of Groton was known as the town of Cockermouth, named for the river that runs through it.  Bill Wadsworth, who donated the land to the Forest Society, first came to the area to attend Cockermouth Boys Camp. 

    • Cross-country Skiing
    • Dog-walking
    • Hiking Trails
    • Hunting
    • Snowshoeing
  • Like so much of New Hampshire, this land was all cleared for pasture by early settlers and remained in that condition until some time in the early 20th century.  It then was abandoned from farming and gradually reverted to forest predominated by white pine.

    • Cross-country Skiing
    • Dog-walking
    • Hiking Trails
    • Hunting
    • Snowshoeing
  • A network of trails starts from Avery Hill Road, including a 1.7 mile marked loop trail that winds through fields and forests to reach the top of Pine Mountain. The trail traverses the Avery Field near the site of the former Avery Farm and ascends the west slope of Pine Mountain. Open blueberry barrens at the summit provide spectacular views of the entire Belknap Range, including Mount Major and Lake Winnipesaukee, as well as excellent berry picking in season.

    • Blueberry picking
    • Cross-country Skiing
    • Dog-walking
    • Hiking Trails
    • Hunting
    • Snowshoeing
  • The Sagamore Creek area holds significant agricultural heritage. In fact, the site of Creek Farm, believed to have been occupied by early settler Nicholas Rowe in 1640, was one of the earliest places in New Hampshire to be cultivated by European settlers. It was later part of the 18th-century farm of the royal governor of New Hampshire, Benning Wentworth.

    • Birdwatching
    • Fishing
    • Hiking Trails
    • Hunting
    • Paddling (canoeing / kayaking)