Hunting

The Forest Society purchased High Five with donated funds in 2004. It got its name when several members of the Forest Society's Land Management staff walked to the top and looked out at the expansive view. One of the staff members remarked that he just wanted to give a “high five," and the name stuck.

These lands had been in the Heald family for more than a century and are collectively known as the Heald Tract. They had historically been well managed by the Healds for multiple uses, including apple orchards, wildlife habitat, forest products, passive recreation, education, and flood control.

A marked trail leads through hemlock woods and past a beaver marsh to the summit of Mount Wallingford. The summit offers a nice view to the north. Look for wild blueberries in season.

Two miles of trails/woods roads over gently rolling terrain through beech and hemlock forest. There are a few vernal pools visible from the trail network, and a field in the southwest corner of the property.

A hiking trail maintained by the Squam Lakes Association runs over this property, offering nice views of Squam Lake.

Three different paths lead to the summit of Green Mountain, where you’ll find the fire tower that’s part of the Green Mountain State Forest, a block of land at the summit surrounded by the High Watch Preserve.