Family-oriented

The floodplain offers a natural sanctuary for not only people, but for wildlife, including turtles, beaver, migratory waterfowl and other birds, such as the cardinal, oriole, bald eagle, osprey, pileated woodpecker, and rose-breasted grosbeak.

A marked trail leads through hemlock woods and past a beaver marsh to the summit of Mount Wallingford. The summit offers a nice view to the north. Look for wild blueberries in season.

The original owner of the property, Reverend Leslie C. Bockes, opened a children’s summer camp on the property for inner city youth from Lowell, Massachusetts. The land has been a Tree Farm, and the previous owners won the NH Timberland Owners Association John Hoar Award in 1978 for exemplary forestry and conservation practices

Two miles of trails/woods roads over gently rolling terrain through beech and hemlock forest. There are a few vernal pools visible from the trail network, and a field in the southwest corner of the property.

A hiking trail maintained by the Squam Lakes Association runs over this property, offering nice views of Squam Lake.

Like much of the region, the slopes of Barton Hill were cleared for farm pastures and timber by the mid 1800s. The abandonment of hill farms allowed this land to gradually revert to a forest of poplar, white birch, and pine.

Dame Forest was owned by the same family since the 1840s and was originally part of the Dame Farm. The stone piles within the property and stone walls along the bounds suggest that the land was cleared and used for pastureland. From the hill at the center of the property, livestock most likely looked out over the Great Bay as they grazed. The farm was abandoned the 1950s and returned to the forest we see today. In the mid 1960s, beaver moved in, creating dramatic wetland habitat that includes stretches of open water.

A gift from Virginia S. Champlin of North Andover, Mass., in 2006, the property was named in honor of Mrs. Champlin's late husband, who took an active role and interest in the management of the land for forestry, wildlife, and recreational purposes. He also played a significant role in the current location of Skyhaven Airport, across Route 108 from the reservation.