Birdwatching

November is a great time to spot golden eagles. They are a rare sight in New Hampshire, but they do pass through the state on their annual migration. Right now they’re on their way south to winter in the central Appalachians.

A marked trail leads through hemlock woods and past a beaver marsh to the summit of Mount Wallingford. The summit offers a nice view to the north. Look for wild blueberries in season.

The original owner of the property, Reverend Leslie C. Bockes, opened a children’s summer camp on the property for inner city youth from Lowell, Massachusetts. The land has been a Tree Farm, and the previous owners won the NH Timberland Owners Association John Hoar Award in 1978 for exemplary forestry and conservation practices

Two miles of trails/woods roads over gently rolling terrain through beech and hemlock forest. There are a few vernal pools visible from the trail network, and a field in the southwest corner of the property.

A hiking trail maintained by the Squam Lakes Association runs over this property, offering nice views of Squam Lake.

The autumn shorebird migration starts early. The very first, early signs of autumn are now found moving southward along beaches and in salt marshes or high above New Hampshire's 13 miles of Atlantic coast.

In the frozen fastness of a winter forest, devoid of green plants and insects, winter tree bark provides important winter insect habitat and a food pantry for forest birds and small mammals hunting for tiny insects or seeds.

Even as we stare down the barrel of the coldest, darkest days of early January, the earliest signs of spring will soon begin anew - even before the first mail-order seed catalogs arrive. Early harbingers of this new natural year are subtle.

A little phoebe nest is tucked beneath the rafters in my backyard woodshed like a miniature wreath. It’s a curious little relic to behold during those long, cold snowy weeks of hauling winter cordwood. By May, it once more cradles eggs and tiny nestlings.