Birdwatching

A reminder about protecting nesting wildlife habitat at the Merrimack River Outdoor Education and Conservation Area.

Birds are always spectacular in May. Now, more of us are actually watching and listening carefully. To quote Hall of Fame Baseball legend Yogi Berra: “You can observe a lot by watching."

Photographer Ellen Kenny is a frequent visitor to the Concord Merrimack River Outdoor Education and Conservation Area. She shares some recent observations and wildlife photographs.

Wood ducks are "dabbling" ducks: feeding on the surface of the water and not diving for food. They eat pond weeds, berries, seeds, aquatic insects and even acorns.

Eggs are a perennial symbol of Easter and Passover. No coincidence. The season of rebirth begins with breeding seasons and eggs containing the embryonic continuance of life.

Late winter sunshine strengthens, days grow warm and snowmelt accelerates in the northern half of New Hampshire. South-facing slopes open-up early. Acorn-producing red oak trees grow best on steep, well-drained south and west-facing slopes.

Figuratively speaking, Northern harriers have largely stayed out of sight, and out of mind of wildlife managers... even though their populations across New England have been on the decline for decades.

 When we think about the kinds of people making important contributions to science, we might imagine someone in a white lab coat, squinting into a microscope, or pouring over reams of computer data.

Standing dead trees (often called snags) are common in our forests, and it’s hard to overstate just how vital a role they play in a healthy ecosystem.