Birdwatching

As the calendar page flipped to March, news from natural world includes early bird harbingers of Spring.

The undeniably stronger late winter sunlight is the agent of change in the forests and fields of New Hampshire.

Feeding birds connects the Forest Society's Dave Anderson to larger questions and brings wildlife right to the window in winter.

Wildlife photographer Ellen Kenny recently shared a fascinating series of photos of interactions between grackles and a pair of nesting ospreys.

After migrations of hundreds or thousands of miles, birds are returning to NH forests. Not all are renowned for voice and plumage — yet each fill an ecological niche.

Ellen Kenny shares her wildlife photos covering events both large and small occurring along Mill Brook in Concord on the Forest Society's Merrimack River Outdoor Education & Conservation Area.

The late September "autumnal equinox" brings days and nights into balance and equal length — but not for long. The beginning of autumn is a time when bird migrations peak as waves of warblers, then raptors — the hawks, falcons, eagles and ospreys — depart New England.

A reminder about protecting nesting wildlife habitat at the Merrimack River Outdoor Education and Conservation Area.

Birds are always spectacular in May. Now, more of us are actually watching and listening carefully. To quote Hall of Fame Baseball legend Yogi Berra: “You can observe a lot by watching."