Natural Resources

Are you a fern fan?

I suppose to most, ferns are just those plants that brush up against your calves while walking or hiking. They tickle and often make tick-weary hikers nervous wherever they lean into the trail.

State Senator Ruth Ward (R-Stoddard) has introduced legislation SB 269 to create a new ecological tool to assist the Department of Natural & Cultural Resources (DNCR) in the management of state-owned lands.

So much of New Hampshire’s natural beauty is obvious; from the top of a mountain trail, from the shore of a lake or pond, even from your kitchen window. You barely have to open your eyes to see it. But take a closer look, and beauty gives way to scientific wonder.

It’s stick season in New Hampshire; the leaves are gone, our landscape exposed; a white nivean blanket covers everything you see. Our trees are dormant. Aren’t they? To look at them, it would seem that trees aren’t doing much right now. But it turns out there’s more going on than meets the eye.

When winter precipitation includes heavy wet snow or freezing rain, trees must endure the weather conditions. Some are better adapted than others and coping strategies vary by tree species.

Chef Hennessey brings the outside in with a creative dose of forage-to-table.

As I sit at my computer in a wool hat with a blanket on my lap, I’m forced to remind myself that winter isn’t official until Friday. Say what? I recall Jack Frost’s frequent visits as of late that make designs on my porch windows. My mind wanders to our depleting cord word supply.

For some of us, “fall back” means an extra hour of sleep to savor. Those of us who rise early are grateful for a little more daylight in the morning. Daylight Saving Time is also a reminder that winter marches closer.

This week we have another edition of New Hampshire’s Wild Neighborhoods, where we take a closer look at one of the more than 200 natural communities you can find within the confines of our state border.