Natural Resources

It’s officially stick season, and while there may be less green in the woods at this time of year, that can sometimes be a good thing.  Late fall and winter is a time when I tend to notice different things in the forest, things that have always been there, but now they jump out at me without the

Autumn in New Hampshire is a wonderful time to watch and observe some easily recognizable stages of natural cycles: hawks migrating, leaves changing color…bears fattening up as they get ready to hibernate.

Are you a fern fan?

I suppose to most, ferns are just those plants that brush up against your calves while walking or hiking. They tickle and often make tick-weary hikers nervous wherever they lean into the trail.

State Senator Ruth Ward (R-Stoddard) has introduced legislation SB 269 to create a new ecological tool to assist the Department of Natural & Cultural Resources (DNCR) in the management of state-owned lands.

NEW: Explore vernal polls on the BIG NIGHT with Dave Anderson! Check out this special video presentation.

It’s stick season in New Hampshire; the leaves are gone, our landscape exposed; a white nivean blanket covers everything you see. Our trees are dormant. Aren’t they? To look at them, it would seem that trees aren’t doing much right now. But it turns out there’s more going on than meets the eye.

Chef Hennessey brings the outside in with a creative dose of forage-to-table.

As I sit at my computer in a wool hat with a blanket on my lap, I’m forced to remind myself that winter isn’t official until Friday. Say what? I recall Jack Frost’s frequent visits as of late that make designs on my porch windows. My mind wanders to our depleting cord word supply.