Land Conservation

CONCORD – Aug. 25, 2016 – A donor has issued a challenge grant that will match $100,000 in donations to the Society for the Protection of New Hampshire Forests’ (Forest Society) effort to create a new conservation and recreation area in Durham, Madbury and Lee.

Saturday, October 1, 2016 - 8:30am

Join us for a rugged hike to the interior of an incredible 236-acre, scenic tract with an extensive woods-road and forestry trail network. The property contains specialized wildlife habitat including a spring-fed perennial stream at the headwaters of Stevens Brook and a high saddle containing a vernal pool. The rocky summit ledges and steep, south-facing rock talus slopes feature a rare sedge species and old growth red oak dry rocky ridge forest.

John Kauffmann was integral to the planning of our national park system. When he brought that expertise to his beloved New Hampshire, big things happened in the North Country. 

This story appears in Forest Notes, Fall 2016. 

A 10-year trend shows New England losing forest cover in expanding urban areas -- where development is permanent and rarely reverts back to forest.

Should the State of New Hampshire have the authority to intervene and block a private property owner’s right to sell his land to the federal government? 

Traveling in the Midwest this past week, I was introduced to a local as being from New Hampshire.

“Oh, New Hampshire,” she gushed, “it’s sooooo beautiful there. When I think of New Hampshire, I think ‘pristine’.”

The Society for the Protection of New Hampshire Forests received a generous grant from the New Hampshire Bar Foundation’s J. Albert and Mildred E. Lynch Fund in support of an updated model conservation easement deed.

NEWBURY – Feb. 17, 2016 –  Members of the hiking community around Mt. Sunapee put their enthusiasm for a popular trail to Lake Solitude to work and quickly helped the Society for the Protection of N.H. Forests (Forest Society) raise funds to conserve the property where the trail begins.

Dec. 17, 2015 – Buoyed by a $380,000 grant from the state’s Land and Community Heritage Investment Program (LCHIP), the Society for the Protection of N.H.